Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Royal Model 10: 1932

Royal Model 10: BEFORE CLEANING
By the way, this typewriter is the heaviest in my collection.
Paper guide: BEFORE
Paper guide: AFTER
Ribbon close up: BEFORE
Ribbon close up: AFTER
In the early morning or early evening when it is too cool to type outside,
this little platform in the Music Room is my favorite place.

19 comments:

  1. Very excellent work! That is quite a difference on the before and after. It must be quite enjoyable having such a good looking typewriter.

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  2. I should send my machines to you for cleaning! My Royal 10 is from 1919 with the two-pane glass.

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  3. Rubber band to hold up type levers = brilliant.

    I was just cursing my bad luck at not having four hands today as I tried to wrestle paper towels under the keys of my QDL for a scrubbing. I've learned a new trick!

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    1. The thick rubber bands that hold stalks of broccoli together are perfect for this.

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    2. I always save the 'broccoli bands' - but I never would have thought of this use. Kewl!

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  4. I really like that finish. It reminds me more of the Royal Deluxe and the post-war crinkle finish machines. Your enablers did well!

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  5. Another example of why I think TW-DB is exactly one year off in its dating: both my NOMDA line book and the Remington-made line book I got from Richard Polt state that serial number was made in 1933, the Remington book even giving the month: December of 1933 (1610M).

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    1. Thanks, Ted! Your sources would seem to be dependable, so I'll keep that in mind.

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  6. by "one year off" I mean specifically with Royals. I believe it's off on a few other manufacturers as well, but I haven't determined which ones or by how much. It's probable that it's just American brands, since his data seems accurate for European brands.

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    1. I know TW-DB alterantes page to page between "from x to y = 19xx" and "up to y = 19xx" which would account for one-year variances. Some brand pages I'm not sure which way he means.

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  7. Nice job! Anything remotely rough or abrasive on crinkle paint seems to either destroy it or leave behind more crud than it cleans. I'm a toothbrush devotee too. I think when you get using them (though mine's a KHM) the reasons for their popularity - and so still plentiful today - speaks for itself. I was wondering if the 10 had a different ribbon advance to the later Royals. The movement of the carriage (not the type levers or ribbon vibrator) winds the ribbon forwards and backwards.

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    1. You're right, Rob; the movement of the carriage does indeed advance the ribbon spools -- either with simply moving the carriage itself, or using the space bar.

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  8. Fantastic cleaning job - looks like new! A very decorative machine.

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  9. Great job cleaning the machine! The before and after pictures are amazing.

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  10. this one is a real beauty.

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  11. I had just the same problem with a worn-down tooth on a Royal 10. Maybe it's an Achilles heel on this model. I had to get a replacement part.

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  12. Beautiful machine! I love the drama of the before and after pics! What a difference a little love and WD-40 can do.

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  13. To have someone find and purchase one of these things for you is a blessing, indeed. What true friends! I absolutely dig the Royal 10. What a beautiful machine.

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