Wednesday, October 24, 2012

It's an Underwood portable! (1938?)

It wasn't until after I looked at these pictures that I realized how WORN the platen is! It's amazing that none of the usual characters such as periods, commas and dashes did not punch any holes in the single layer of paper.
I also didn't realize just HOW really dirty this machine is. Embarrassing? Only slightly.
A bit of rust, too...
Something about the closeup of my hand is disturbing. Oh well. Deal!


Just an excuse to draw a red circle and an arrow. FUN!
"Just call me Spotty!" I am so going to clean you up.
A trick of the flash made the metal around these keys look green. Nice graphic letters, eh?

Who woulda thought that I could take such artistic pictures? The yellow background is actually a rubber glove, that I used during the WD-40 rejuvenation process.
It took me a minute or two to figure out what this was for. Duh!
...except for the other logo in back, that is.
Rather a petite machine, this.

12 comments:

  1. Sounds like an Underwood Junior; definitely a depression machine. At least yours has backspace! Mine doesn't even have a shift on the right side of the keyboard, let along backspace!

    The ribbon cups are nice, but you are right; they can get in the way. I do like it when machines have them, and I am willing to take the extra step checking the ribbon.

    Congrats!

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    1. Wow, Ken, I didn't know that typewriters came with even LESS features than mine, such as the lack of backspace and right shift key.

      So much to learn! How many collected typewriters will it take me to be properly educated? HA HA!

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  2. Sure is a nice Underwood. I am unsure of the model, but your description makes it sound like a depression-era machine when all the companies really cut back on features to keep selling machines even if they were short on features.
    I love those keys and the way the body slopes.

    Perhaps some similar sized round feed from Wal-Mart or the local hardware store attached with velcro may work as a substitute. The original ones may have had a rubber protrusion that would fit through the hole and then expand to hold the feet after it was fully through.

    Congratulations on your very cool Underwood!

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    1. Bill, your theory about the rubber protrusion makes perfect sense. Perhaps it's similar to the Olivetti grommets I have on the bottom of my Lettera 31 and 32. I'll figure out some sort of substitution.

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  3. Very nice score! I think '38 must be close, my understanding is that crinkle paint came into use in the late '30's.

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    1. My Royal Model 10, dating from '32 or '33, has the black crinkle paint, too.

      But the more I study this Underwood, the more I am convinced that it was indeed made in the later 1930s, with the gently sloping lines that became even more popular in the '40s. The styles of the earlier years of the '30s seemed a bit more "boxy" and angular to me.

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  4. I love antique stores like the one you describe, and despite the ones that smell of potpourri and are full of gingham and glass.

    It is fun to share our new finds with fellow typegeeks, isn't it! Thanks for showing us this one.

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    Replies
    1. "Despite" was meant to be "despise"!

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    2. I liked the way you used "despite"! Either way works!

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  5. Lovely find, congratulations! I also noticed the cool ribbon covers.

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  6. What a lovely specimen! I bet it will be beautiful once you get it all polished up!

    I'm the same way in an antique store. Total giveaway spaz.

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